The Snail Girl, a gorgeous table lamp by Valmore Gemignani and RuM – Rosenthal und Maeder

Art Nouveau Table Lamp Snail Girl, by Valmore Gemignani and RuM

2,800

Art Nouveau Table Lamp
Make Your Offer Now
Art Nouveau Table Lamp

Art Nouveau Table Lamp Snail Girl, by Valmore Gemignani and RuM

2,800

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Art Nouveau Table Lamp
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Art Nouveau Table Lamp

Art Nouveau Table Lamp Snail Girl, by Valmore Gemignani and RuM

2,800

Make me an offer that I cannot refuse!

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Art Nouveau Table Lamp “The Snail Girl”, Germany circa 1910.
Sculpted alabaster and shell (turbo marmoratus) figural lamp by Valmore Gemignani. Incised on the base side, “Gemignani,” and on the underside is an “R.u.M. (Rosenthal und Maeder, Berlin)” bronze medallion inset.
Dimensions (cm): 16(H) x 24(W) x 17(D).
It is in its original condition, with a few minor signs of wear.

This piece is a rare example of a German design metamorphosis motif, which may harken from Japanese mythology, of a demon (oni) who can shapeshift from a snail to a beautiful woman to seek out male victims. This dangerous female motif of Japanese origin is undoubtedly in keeping with fin de siecle fascination with the “femme fatale” and Japonisme.

Valmore Gemignani (Carrara, 1878; Firenze, 1958) was an Italian sculptor, ceramist, decorator, and painter. He studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Florence under the guidance of Antonio Bortone, Augusto Rivalta, and Giovanni Fattori. From 1906 to 1915, he lived in Berlin, achieving a certain notoriety. In Germany, he was active as a ceramist at the Rosenthal Imperial Factory, replacing Filippo Cifariello. He returned to Florence in 1915.

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Valmore Gemignani(Carrara, 1878; Firenze, 1958)
Valmore Gemignani (Carrara, 1878; Firenze, 1958)
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